68W & Ranger Advice

Someguy77

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Just a little background:

I am 27 years old and headed to MEPS on the 25th-26th with a 68W contract. No Opt 40 available at the time AND airborne filled up already, but I am going to see if there is anything I can do to get it in my contract anyways (if that's even possible). I already have my NREMT-B and roughly 4 years in the medical field between running on the medic and working in the emergency department.



I have read a bit about 68W and what the job entails and from my understanding from a previous post earlier is: 68W basically does anything medical related, from boring shit to the fun shit, okay, understandable. However, I have full intentions of going to RASP, entering the regiment and getting to ranger school. I was told from there, after getting into the regiment AND being tabbed we're sent to SOCM training. I have been trying to find any books available that are up to date (or just info period) that I could review and study to just better myself overall and help out when the time comes.

Not looking for any shortcuts or tips to get around anything, just looking for anything I could read up on (if there was anything specific anyone had to share).
 

Stretcher Jockey

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Cant give specific reccomendations for SOCM, but be aware that prior medical people tend to struggle through military medic courses. A lot of ego gets involved, and even though you have experience in the field, military and civillian medicine is different. They will teach you exactly what you need to know to graduate and be successful in the course.

That being said, reading up on current TCCC guidelines is always a good idea. And all your EMT-B skills are always of paramount importance so keep those sharp.
 

Someguy77

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be aware that prior medical people tend to struggle through military medic courses. A lot of ego gets involved
I have heard similar things as well. Just like anywhere when practicing medicine though, you're always learning. It never stops. So as long as you keep that "We're all learning, all the time, together and I actually don't know it all." it seems like that obstacle should be able to be avoided.

Not sure if it's changed that you have to be tabbed to go, you didn't used to have to be.
That....was an incredible read, thank you very much. I have read several things here and there but that seemed very much so up to date and very imformative.
 

Cookie_

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Not looking for any shortcuts or tips to get around anything, just looking for anything I could read up on (if there was anything specific anyone had to share).
If you want to be a Ranger medic, your best resource will be the Ranger Medic Handbook, as it comes straight from Regiment and the DOD.

To give an example of what @policemedic is talking about;
Myself and a dude from 10th group are in a civilian EMT-B program; neither of us are medics, but we've both done CLS and some other trauma type trainings.

We both have found that we've needed to change our thinking and procedures when working through scenarios, as what we've been taught from the military doesn't always line up with what the civilian side wants/allows.
 

medicchick

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If you want to be a Ranger medic, your best resource will be the Ranger Medic Handbook, as it comes straight from Regiment and the DOD.

To give an example of what @policemedic is talking about;
Myself and a dude from 10th group are in a civilian EMT-B program; neither of us are medics, but we've both done CLS and some other trauma type trainings.

We both have found that we've needed to change our thinking and procedures when working through scenarios, as what we've been taught from the military doesn't always line up with what the civilian side wants/allows.
RP and I joke that when it comes to peds, geriatrics or illness I'm up. Trauma is him lead me helping...lol The Ranger Medic Handbook is awesome, we still have one around here.
 

Someguy77

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If you want to be a Ranger medic, your best resource will be the Ranger Medic Handbook, as it comes straight from Regiment and the DOD.

Awesome, I will order that and start skimming through it. I would like to get as familiar as possible with what goes on, protocols, etc. I feel like it couldn't hurt unless anyone has any other opinions on that plan?

I saw a BUNCH of different books regarding the Ranger Medic Handbook, just everything was different, not everything was up to date as far as I know so it was just a matter of finding what exactly am I looking for.
 

Devildoc

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I went to Corps school and Field Med as a civilian-trained and experienced paramedic; flight and EMS. The biggest differences are exactly as @policemedic stated. I definitely had a YUGE leg-up on my colleagues who had no medical training, but I had to un-do some of the ways that I think.

Don't worry about reading up too much because new standards come out all the time, but I would definitely, absolutely bone up on your A&P, med math, and patient assessment stuff.
 

Centermass

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Ok. A few points.

1. You need to contact the 75th Regimental Recruiting POC to get a better shot at RASP and the Regiment without a contract. It's been done before many times.
75recruit@socom.mil 706-545-5124

2. You do not need to be "Tabbed" for entry into the Regiment or to attend SOCM.

3. The route will be basic, 68W training, then BAC or RASP (It changes which one first) currently being BAC then RASP. Once complete, then SOCM.

Here's something that will give you an in depth perspective. I suggest you read it. It's a few years old, but pretty much still holds true to this day. Pay close attention to what you read as you won't find a write up like this anywhere else.

READ THIS

Good luck
 

policemedic

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@Devildoc is right. A&P is A&P; pharmacology/pharmacodynamics/pharmakinetics and drug math don’t change. Patient assessment may be performed differently—you haven’t lived until you’ve performed a rapid trauma assessment in sensory overload/deprivation conditions—but the basic findings don’t change. Rales are rales, cranial nerves respond the same way, appendicitis presents the same way. Therefore, if you understand A&P and know how to do a proper physical exam you’ll be ahead of the game. You won’t need too much of this in 68W school because {insert Big Army rant here} but it will definitely help when they turn on the fire hose at SOCM and advanced more in-depth knowledge and skills are taught.

Buy an anatomy coloring book. No, I’m not kidding. If you have time before you ship, take a semester of A&P with lab. You’ll thank me later.

Good luck.
 

Someguy77

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@Devildoc is right. A&P is A&P; pharmacology/pharmacodynamics/pharmakinetics and drug math don’t change. Patient assessment may be performed differently—you haven’t lived until you’ve performed a rapid trauma assessment in sensory overload/deprivation conditions—but the basic findings don’t change. Rales are rales, cranial nerves respond the same way, appendicitis presents the same way. Therefore, if you understand A&P and know how to do a proper physical exam you’ll be ahead of the game. You won’t need too much of this in 68W school because {insert Big Army rant here} but it will definitely help when they turn on the fire hose at SOCM and advanced more in-depth knowledge and skills are taught.

Buy an anatomy coloring book. No, I’m not kidding. If you have time before you ship, take a semester of A&P with lab. You’ll thank me later.

Good luck.

Thank you very much for this, I unfortunately don't have time to take a semester before shipping out. However, I have taken A&P 1 & A&P 2 in college, both lecture + lab. Pharmacology, Dosage Calculations, and Pathophysiology as well. Pharm, I unfortunately feel like we got slacked and didn't learn nearly as much as we "should have." But I can self teach that with the book we are provided. I believe I actually still have my A&P coloring book also.

A&P refresher would certainly be of help. Do I need to continue as in-depth as I was in school? Like knowing right common iliac artery, inferior mesenteric artery, etc.
 

Cookie_

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A&P refresher would certainly be of help. Do I need to continue as in-depth as I was in school? Like knowing right common iliac artery, inferior mesenteric artery, etc.
From the post that @Centermass recommend for you to read:

The culmination of the A & P block is the Gross Pin Test. You will walk through the cadaver lab and have to name various muscles, organs, nerves, vessels. You will have to state which nerve innervates which muscle. What endocrine gland secretes which hormone. Etc.
So, given those examples, it seems like a high level of A&P knowledge can only help.
 

Devildoc

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For cadaver lab, there are a couple texts that have for-real pics instead of drawings, and show them from multiple views. In every gross pin test I have had you cannot touch 'the thing' and 'the thing' can be sitting on the table in such a way it looks different than in the book.
 

Someguy77

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From the post that @Centermass recommend for you to read:



So, given those examples, it seems like a high level of A&P knowledge can only help.

Ah yes, I apologize about that I didn't get a chance to read it just yet. Past 2 days I have been slammed at work, trying to get my errands ran and keeping everything together. I'm off work tomorrow, so tonight I will get a good chance to read up on it and do some research. Thank you again, you and everyone that has been helping me out.
 
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