Are "double taps" a bad idea now?

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Stormer_117

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Greetings all,

I've started to focus on speed & recoil control with the 5.56. (Yes, noobs like me actually feel "recoil" with a 5.56 :() The other day at the range, I had a cumulative "double tap" accuracy of around 70%, for a head size target at around 20 yards. Which means that MOST of my second shots missed the target completely (they would've still hit a chest size target though.)

I googled for tips and apparently found that some instructors these days are advising against the 'double tap' mentality, in favor of 'controlled pairs'. I'm assuming the difference is that the latter requires a clear sight picture for both shots, while the former is somewhat 'instinctive' for the second shot... please correct me if I am mistaken here.

So given the assumption above: Is the 'double tap' a bad idea? And if it is a bad idea, how "clear" should the sight picture be for the second shot? I mean, should I wait until the reticule is completely steady before popping off the second shot?

Thanks
 

busdriver

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Whatever it is that you need to see to make the first hit, is the same thing you need to see to make the second hit.
 

Gunz

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The recoil, even with 556, in a rapid-fire double shot can jar the barrel just off bullseye for that second tap....in this case a target the size of a man's head.

A few things you can try.

Practice double tap for a center mass target instead of a head shot.

You can also change your grip on the foreend so your thumb is topside to steady that little climb up the recoil gradient...and "drive" your rifle into the target. I don't mean you're actually moving toward the target...I mean your upper body has more of a lean into the target as if you were going to drive the barrel right through it. Easy to demonstrate, harder to explain.

You can also take more time on the second shot, as you suggested, wait for a sight-picture before the 2nd trigger pull, and gradually decrease the time between shots as you get more proficient with practice.
 
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Topkick

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You can also take more time on the second shot, as you suggested, wait for a sight-picture before the 2nd trigger pull, and gradually decrease the time between shots as you get more proficient with practice.

Agreed. This takes time but it works with a lot of reps.
 

DocIllinois

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Find a good (non-Google) firearms instructor and master the fundamentals of shooting a rifle. Deliberate participation and honesty with the instructor about what level of expertise you're going for would be good ideas.

Then start asking them about stuff like this.

$.02
 

Stormer_117

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to steady that little climb up the recoil gradient...

Ohhhh wait! I think I know what's happening now! Because my misses are actually down and to the left, in the 7oclock position... I think that means I'm "over driving" or over-compensating for the recoil... I do have an angled foregrip so my thumb is usually on the top side of the barrel, but I'm pulling the barrel down, anticipating more recoil then exists...

See, this is one of those problems you just can't train for with dry-firing exercises, because you need that recoil impulse to get used to it....

Anyways, thanks for your input Ocoka, your advice triggered the right train of thought in my head!

Find a good (non-Google) firearms instructor and master the fundamentals of shooting a rifle. Deliberate participation and honesty with the instructor about what level of expertise you're going for would be good ideas.

Then start asking them about stuff like this.

$.02

Yep that is the best option. I got some quick lessons from the resident instructor who teaches the 'advanced firearms' course at my range. It did help a lot. But I focused mostly on dry firing (I had a lot of issues with my stance.) But most of the time I spent correcting it was via dry firing exercises, and not getting used to actual recoil.... so now I gotta put the range time in, to get used to the actual recoil impulse, without freaking out and driving the barrel downwards on my follow up shots, like an idiot.
 

Stormer_117

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Grip. Stance. Cheek weld. Sight alignment/sight picture. Safety manipulation. Trigger press. Follow through. This is what you need to learn. Until this is mastered, forget double taps.

That's what I've been working on over the past year, I only moved to 'double taps' after my accuracy at 20 yards for head size targets went to 100%. So when I shoot slowly and take my time, it all works. But I have very little practice with speeding all of these steps up for quick follow up shots... And the only way to get that practice is push myself to shoot fast (it's very intimidating right now, I'm not used to it.)
 

Stormer_117

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Your "lolz" make me want to double-tap you with my fist.

Dude...

 
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