combat diving

clerkunrl

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#1
hi
i am special forces diver
and have been using rebreather sets for past 6 years
recently we encountered a dry drowning incident during one of our training missions
i would like to ask fellow divers
if there is a buoyancy control device available for use with re-breather sets
thanks
 

Teufel

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#9
I think the biggest reason that there is no BCD for the rebreather is that you aren't normally diving deeper than 25 feet and you normally stay at whatever depth you are at. You just have to get better at bleeding off the minimum amount of air to get to the depth that you want. I'm sure there is a rebreather BCD out there though.
 

clerkunrl

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#10
I think the biggest reason that there is no BCD for the rebreather is that you aren't normally diving deeper than 25 feet and you normally stay at whatever depth you are at. You just have to get better at bleeding off the minimum amount of air to get to the depth that you want. I'm sure there is a rebreather BCD out there though.
i totally understand your point brother ...
but in temp of 40 F and below the stress on body is very high and the same led to an unfortunate incident.. hence the requirement
 

Teufel

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#12
i totally understand your point brother ...
but in temp of 40 F and below the stress on body is very high and the same led to an unfortunate incident.. hence the requirement
What kind of thermal protection are you using for those temperatures? Stress on the body is reduced with appropriate equipment. Might be time for a dry suit if you are spending long periods of time in water that cold. Temperature of the water should not affect your buoyancy control.
 

Teufel

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#14
3mm is not nearly enough rubber for 40 degree water. I would solve that issue before worrying about a BCD for closed circuit diving. At the very least get a vest or a shorty to layer underneath in the short term.
 

Teufel

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#15
How did one of your guys dry drown on a closed circuit rig? Any water that he aspirated would also likely drown the rig and flush sodasorb into his system causing a whole host of problems.
 

clerkunrl

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#16
How did one of your guys dry drown on a closed circuit rig? Any water that he aspirated would also likely drown the rig and flush sodasorb into his system causing a whole host of problems.
yeah well some questions are best left unanswered .... but hopefully people have drawn the right lessons .. it seemed to be a case of dry drowning and asphyxiation ... we lost a good man
 

Ranger Psych

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#17
Actually, questions about how a troop died are best answered fully so that any deficiencies in equipment or training are identified and corrected.

If anything, you owe it to his memory to fully understand the situation that happened and even if it boils down to pure operator error... having that name on the memorial is something you can point to specifically as a blunt reminder for junior personnel regardless of what the overall outcome of the cause is. It sucks, but some rules/regs/TTP's are written in blood.
 

clerkunrl

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#18
Actually, questions about how a troop died are best answered fully so that any deficiencies in equipment or training are identified and corrected.

If anything, you owe it to his memory to fully understand the situation that happened and even if it boils down to pure operator error... having that name on the memorial is something you can point to specifically as a blunt reminder for junior personnel regardless of what the overall outcome of the cause is. It sucks, but some rules/regs/TTP's are written in blood.
true brother
and we are doing all of those .. the question i refer too is who caused it ...
 

Teufel

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#19
This may be a language barrier. Dry drowning to us means that the person in question drowned on dry land because of water in his lungs that he aspirated in the ocean.
 

clerkunrl

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#20
we talk of dry drowning as any incident in which the oxygen supply to lungs is cutoff ... When water or other foreign bodies are inhaled, laryngospasm occurs and the person's larynx spasms shut. As a result, the vacuum created by the diaphragm cannot be filled by the inrush of air into the lungs, and the vacuum persists. In an attempt to force air in through the spasmed larynx, the person may breathe deeper and with more effort, but this only increases the vacuum's force inside the chest. The obstruction to the inflow of oxygen causes hypoxia, and the obstruction to the outflow of carbon dioxide causes acidosis, both resulting in death .
 
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