Doing a final on American Special Operation units. All input welcome.

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Fucci26

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I'm writing a paper on all of the United States Special Operation units including the Coast Guard's elite Deployable Operations Group I believe it's called. It's nothing against the CG, but my professor said if it doesn't fall under SOCOM don't use it. Here goes, I have 19,500 words compiled into a rough draft so far. I have information on all from Special Forces, Rangers, SEALs, SWCCs, Force Recon, MEU (SOC), Force Recon, MARSOC, and Air Force Pararescue, CCT, and Special Operations Whether Men. I have searching this site to see insight into how some of you men speak about your respective units. I have gained a good 6,000 words from that alone. But after all the research on this site and www.another forum.com. I'm still empty on certain aspects. I have read 9 books on all of the Special Operation units. They were great sources but did not tell me some of the things I'd like to add this. It's 65% percent of my grade, so I'm busting hard for this. I'm not trying to barge in on things that aren't my business, so, please if I'm in the wrong, please tell me.

Army Special Forces = I have 3 solid paragraphs on their ability. What I'm lacking is, in a few of the books it read they were transformed from OSS units, but on other accounts of books and sites it reads they came from American/Canadian task forces from WW2. Can I get verification on which one is more plausible?

Army Rangers = I need to know where they fit in the world of Special Operations. Several articles place them along units like 101st Airborne and the 82nd. I know this isn't fair to either of those units, but it is how certain books portray them.

Navy SEALs = This one is relatively short, I'm having a hard time finding who the original members of Red Cell were, why were they created? All the internet wants to tell me is "in response to the Cold War." Other than that, I could write a thousand papers on SEALs alone with all the history that is given about them.

Navy SWCCs = Same thing as Rangers, where do they fit? With the current GWOT in desert and mountain terrain how do these River Killers operate? Do they also operate in helicopter gunner billets?

Marine Recon = How have they handled since MARSOC? Also, what was the transition from Raiders to Recon, and why?

MEU (SOC) = Special Operations Capable is a term only indigenous to the Corps. Why is that?

Marine Force Recon = Few hours of researching can tell anyone that they were once the premier Special Operations units of the Corps. In some eyes, still are. What happened to their training since MARSOC absorbed several Force Recon operators into their program. I read that Force Recon Marines used to go through a seven month Special Operations Course. Common sense tells me that is now ITC for MARSOC. So, what is their training now. (I'm not asking for detail, I understand that goes beyond what anyone can tell me).

Air Force Special Operations = I was lucky enough to speak with a former Pararescue and he gave me a great deal of information. Also, what is the process that entry level airman after two-three years of advanced training are allowed to entire the Tier One Special Tactics Squadron?

Thank all of you so much who took the time to read this, and are willing to help. I have searched endlessly for information that is appealing to read. I've failed papers before for having "boring" papers. My professor spent 20 years in the Army as an ammunitions officer. So, she'll know if I made something up.

Once again, thank you all.
 

Marauder06

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It would be easier for us and probably better for you if you posted what you had here and let us dissect it for you.
 

Fucci26

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Will do. Since I don't have my flash drive at the time. I'll write out the general ideas I have thus far.
 

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What I'm lacking is, in a few of the books it read they were transformed from OSS units, but on other accounts of books and sites it reads they came from American/Canadian task forces from WW2. Can I get verification on which one is more plausible?
It's not one or the other, it's both. You can look up unit lineage, to include SF, very easily.

Army Rangers = I need to know where they fit in the world of Special Operations. Several articles place them along units like 101st Airborne and the 82nd. I know this isn't fair to either of those units, but it is how certain books portray them.
sofrep.com has some great articles written on the modern day Ranger regiment. To be short and to the point, their main mission is to carry out direct action operation against high value targets.

Navy SEALs = This one is relatively short, I'm having a hard time finding who the original members of Red Cell were, why were they created? All the internet wants to tell me is "in response to the Cold War." Other than that, I could write a thousand papers on SEALs alone with all the history that is given about them.
Why, of all things in NSW history, would you be worried about "red cell"?

Marine Recon = How have they handled since MARSOC? Also, what was the transition from Raiders to Recon, and why?

MEU (SOC) = Special Operations Capable is a term only indigenous to the Corps. Why is that?
I thought your professor said that the paper was to be limited to units under SOCOM?

Also, it seems to me that you are missing a lot of units (assuming this paper is to be all inclusive). Navy EOD, MISO, Civil Affairs, 160th SOAR are all missing based on what you wrote above. I agree with Marauder06, you should post the paper so we can have at it.
 
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Squidward

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If I'm not mistaken when the OSS was disbanded two organizations came from the ashes. Special Forces and the CIA. Members from the Regiment's beginning come from both the OSS (COL Aaron Bank, COL Wendell Fertig and Lt. COL Russell W. Volckmann) and the First Special Service Force (The Devil's Brigade). First was the Tenth Special Forces Group which moved to Bad Tolz then the 77th Special Forces Group which stayed at Ft. Bragg (Smoke Bomb Hill). From the 77th came the 7th, and so on. Hope this helps.
 
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Fucci26

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Navy SEALs - This is America's currently most well known Special Operation Force, especially after the take down of America's number one most wanted fugitive. They have been used in every major and less known engagement since their start in the early 60's. They have set a reputation for themselves as reliable, handy, and near-unstoppable. They work hand in hand with other Special Operations units. They have had several fatalities in the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Two of their men lost have received the Congressional Medal Of Honor. They are America's top amphibious covert force.

Army Special Forces - This is the oldest still active American Special Forces. They have a well known reputation for being unconventional warfare experts and foreign internal defense experts. Like their sailor brothers, they also work with all other special operation units. They have years of history in guerilla warfare, and teaching others to fight against what oppresses them.

Army Rangers - The lead light infantry special operations unit provided to the United States Special Operations Command SOCOM. Their speciality is airfield seizures and direct action. They have broad history, including but not limited too: the Somalian civil war in 1993.

Marine Special Operations including Recon, SOC units, and MARSOC - The Marine Corps has several variations of elite special operation units. This is not to be included that some people (Including Marines) believe that the Marine Corps is superior to all other branches in all possible ways. These units include Marine division and Force Reconnaissance. This men were the direct correlation from World War Two's Marine Raiders who did several POW rescues in the war against Japan. The division and Force Reconnaissance companies conducted several operations in Vietnam, and others in between the Cold War and The Golf War. These men have been highly active in the current Global War On Terror. They have now formed a completely funded special operations units entitled under MARSOC Marines Special Operations Command. Despite a rocky start, they are now head to head with all of the other special operation units. Their formal areas of expertise are foreign internal defense, deep surveillance reconnaissance and direct action.

Air Force Special Operations - The most known of the United States Air Force special operations are the Pararescue airmen. These are die hard men who stop at nothing to save a man/woman that is in danger. They have various counterparts including Special Operations Weather Men who conduct daring weather assessments based on the small amount they have to work with, they also use their ability to organize air strikes. They work hand in hand with other special operation units.


If I had my actual paper on hand, I'd be able to upload it here. I'll have to do that sometime next week after I finish it. But this so far is the general status of the paper. These are the ideals of each subject. I'm using around a 300 word paragraph for each unit. I'm hoping by the end to have it under 2000 words.

Thanks again.

It's not one or the other, it's both. You can look up unit lineage, to include SF, very easily.



sofrep.com has some great articles written on the modern day Ranger regiment. To be short and to the point, their main mission is to carry out direct action operation against high value targets.



Why, of all things in NSW history, would you be worried about "red cell"?



I thought your professor said that the paper was to be limited to units under SOCOM?

Also, it seems to me that you are missing a lot of units (assuming this paper is to be all inclusive). Navy EOD, MISO, Civil Affairs, 160th SOAR are all missing based on what you wrote above. I agree with Marauder06, you should post the paper so we can have at it.
goon175, I had actually turned in a draft compiling all of the ones you listed in the last sentence structure. She took a quick glance look of all about 30 seconds. Handed it back and said "Go to wikipedia, only write down the IMPORTANT Special Operations."

I seriously just should have did the paper on sports or career goals like everybody else.

As for the Red Cell, their are several articles now about SEAL Team Six or DEVGRU whichever you prefer. Their start came from Red Cell, did it not? Or did I misconstrue something along the way? On the MARSOC area, I included their history. As to what made them who they are today, and all the great men that helped get them to the level they are at now. I'm not really going into detail about these units, just about what they accomplished, in order to get MARSOC up and rolling in 2005.
 

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After working with SOCOM, USCG, DHS, and the D.O.G. / JMTC, I think you should include the D.O.G. solely for their purpose in life. Research a bit into what exactly the D.O.G. does. They coexist with DHS/FBI HRT and do an extremely great job of protecting the homeland from Maritime threat. Even though they're not considered as a part of SOCOM, they probably should be.

Part of that thought process may be that they do not pull from SOCOM funds, they pull from DHS who has VERY DEEP POCKETS, moreso than the Warriors on the ground in 2 theaters. This fact = very high quality kit and training. Some of the TACLETS and the MSRT can stand toe to to with any SFODA, especially on the water.

0699??
 

goon175

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Bro, you are all over the place. Is this a college level assignment? I'm not trying to be a dick or anything, but it needs some serious work. I could point out stuff for all the units you listed in that last post, but I will let the guys who represent those units do that and just focus on my former organization, the Army Rangers.


The lead light infantry special operations unit provided to the United States Special Operations Command
I don't like that term, it makes it seem like the Regiment is on loan to SOCOM. A better word would "assigned" to the US SOCOM.


They have broad history, including but not limited too: the Somalian civil war in 1993
Did you just scroll down the wikipedia page and pick a random conflict? If you are only going to mention one, I would say mention some of their contributions to the current GWOT, like taking Haditha Dam, rescuing Jessica Lynch, or the rescue of the Navy SEALs on Takur Ghar, among many other things that have happened in the GWOT. The 75th Ranger Regiment has been involved in every conflict in some degree or another in the 21st century. With the battalions’ flexibility, they are able to deploy for worldwide, no notice missions. On November 24th, 2000 the 75th Ranger Regiment deployed a Ranger Command and Control element and Regimental Recon Detachment (RRD) team two in support of TF Falcon in Kosovo.
After the tragic terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the 75th Ranger Regiment was called on to spearhead the way into the G.W.O.T. and the call was answered in full force. On the night of October 19, 2001 components of Companies A and C, 3rd Ranger Battalion, conducted a daring low level parachute assault onto Objective Rhino, a desert airfield in south western Afghanistan, in order to capture key logistical information. During follow on missions, Company B, 3rd Battalion minus accomplished a successful night parachute assault into Bastogne DZ to secure a desert landing strip in support of a special operations raid.
In order to establish a Flight Landing Strip for follow on combat operations, Regimental Reconnaissance Detachment (RRD) Team 3 conducted a combat military free fall parachute drop onto Wrath Drop Zone in southeast Afghanistan on 10 November 2001.
RRD Team 3 conducted a combat static line parachute drop onto Shiloh Drop Zone in southeast Afghanistan on 21 November, 2001 to establish a flight Landing Strip for follow on combat operations.
In the early morning hours of March 4, 2002, on a mountaintop called Takur Ghar in southeastern Afghanistan, Al Qaeda soldiers fired on an MH-47E helicopter carrying a Special Operations Force (SOF) reconnaissance element. The damage on the helicopter resulted in a Navy SEAL, Neal Roberts, falling out of the helicopter and began a chain of events that lead to Rangers performing at their best. After a failed attempt by a group of Navy SEALs to rescue Roberts, the plan was devised to send two QRFs to engage the enemy and recover the SEAL. Without knowing about the Navy SEAL attempt failing due to an ambush, the QRF of Razor One landed in the same exact area. They befell the same ambush and quickly reacted to secure their position. While the battle raged Razor One was able to contact the incoming QRF of Razor Two, and in response landed further down the mountain and hiked up to join the battle. Razor 2 made quick time of the trek they had and joined the fight, reinforcing the pinned down QRF Razor One. The battle of Takur Gahr ended with the death of all the Al Qaeda terrorists defending the mountaintop and resulting in the death of seven US servicemen. Rangers demonstrated the will to defeat the enemy and took control of the situation effectively and quickly in order to uphold “never shall I leave a fallen comrade to fall into the hands of the enemy”.
On 28 March 2003, the 3rd Ranger Battalion was the first unit to airborne assault into Iraq to seize “Objective Serpent” in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. A few days later Company A, 3rd Battalion and sections of HHC, 3rd Battalion carried out a successful parachute assault on H2 Airfield in Western Iraq. On the night of March 31, 2003, Company B 3rd Battalion gained a foothold at the Haditha Dam complex and fought off elements from the Iraqi Republican Guard’s Hammurabi Division over the course of the next week.
On April 1, 2003, US Marines staged a diversionary attack, besieging nearby Iraqi irregulars to draw them away from the Saddam Hospital in Nasiriyah. Meanwhile, an element from a Joint Special Operations Task Force consisting of Rangers from 1st Ranger Battalion launched a nighttime raid on the hospital and successfully retrieved Lynch and the bodies of eight other American soldiers.
RRD Team 3 conducted a combat military free fall parachute drop onto Tillman Drop Zone in southeast Afghanistan in July 2004 in order to emplace tactical equipment. The Regimental Reconnaissance Company Team 1 would again conduct a combat military free fall parachute drop with a tandem passenger into Afghanistan on 11 July 2009 in order to emplace tactical equipment.
The never-ending changes of warfare called for the need of an extremely flexible and sustainable Ranger Force. The Regiment Special Troops Battalion (RSTB) was activated July 17th, 2006 in order to answer that call. The RSTB conducts sustainment, intelligence, recon, and maintenance missions which were previously accomplished by small detachments assigned to the Regimental headquarters and then attached within each of the three Ranger Battalions. The activation of RSTB signified the change of the Ranger force conducting short-term combat missions to continuous combat operations without the loss of effectiveness or flexibility.
Currently the 75th Ranger Regiment, with all of its battalions, continues to spearhead operations in multiple foreign countries from many different locations; never before seen in military history. They continue to work with all branches of the military- special operations, conventional and coalition forces, conducting joint special operations across the full spectrum of combat.
The 75th Ranger Regiment is the first unit in the military to be awarded the Global War on Terrorism, Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom streamer.
While maintaining a constant deployment rotation, Rangers are always training in and out of combat to prepare for their short to no-notice would-wide combat deployments.
Ranger Mission: The 75th Ranger Regiment’s mission is to plan and conduct special missions in support of U.S. policy and objectives.
The 75th Ranger Regiment is a direct-action special operations raid force that conducts forcible entry operations and special operations raids across the entire spectrum of combat. The Regiment is capable of planning and executing complex worldwide operations in high-risk, uncertain, and politically sensitive areas. It is constantly transforming to meet future operational requirements without sacrificing mission success.
The Regiment’s four battalions geographically located throughout the U.S., can deploy anywhere in the world for no-notice missions. Their capabilities include direct action raids in limited visibility, adverse weather, varied terrain and complex operating environments to capture or kill designated targets and/or seize terrain and strategic installations. Capable of infiltrating by land, sea or air, the 75th Ranger Regiment is trained on a wide variety of mobility platforms and operates fully integrated with supporting agencies and other Special Operations Forces as required.
The unit has an intensive Regimental assessment and selection process where only the most exceptional officers, non-commissioned officers, and soldiers are selected to serve. From the arduous training to the continuous and demanding worldwide deployments, the Rangers of the 75th Ranger Regiment continue to demonstrate their motto, “Rangers Lead the Way.”

· Primary tasks:
o Direct Action
o Raids
o Special Reconnaissance
o Counter Terrorism
o Airborne, Air Assault, and Waterborne Operations
o Airfield Seizure
· Other Roles:
o Counter Drug Operations
o Foreign Internal Defense
o Unconventional Warfare
o Hostage Rescue
o Personnel/Sensitive Equipment Recovery
o Clandestine Insertion
o Sensitive Site Exploitation

Also, you mentioned that Special Forces is the oldest SOF unit. The Rangers are actually considered to be the oldest SOF unit, dating back to the 1600's. Also, according to http://www.history.army.mil/html/forcestruc/lineages/branches/sf/default.htm SF traces it's lineage to the WW2 Ranger Battalions as well as the OSS and other units that were mentioned above.

"Go to wikipedia, only write down the IMPORTANT Special Operations."
Ask your teacher how the team who took down UBL got to their target? Or ask her who is currently deployed in small teams in Africa doing work that doesn't make headlines? Why would you include SWCC but not 160th, that doesn't make sense. Or if it is supposed to be about SOCOM units, why would you include units not in SOCOM but exclude ones that are?
 

AWP

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A MEU(SOC) is "special operations" and falls under SOCOM?

Um...

Besides your lack of understanding the material, you also have several obvious typos in your first post.

So you went to Wikipedia and another SOF site...what else have you used for sources? To echo what goon said, you are all over the place and to be blunt: some of it is plain wrong or you're looking at details (Red Cell, Tier 1 AFSOC selection) when you don't even know what trees you're taking about.
 

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It all reads to me Fucci that you're more concerned with word count than getting to the facts, or the true "meat and potato's" of the topic. Were this my paper I'd start chronilogicaly and construct my paper on a timeline rather than just listing the individual components of our SOF machine and their capabilities etc. If you do the work, using a timeline will allow your paper to progress along side the historical progression of SOF. If you do the work your paper will not only lay out the nuts and bolts but provide a well presented demonstration of not only what each components capabilities are.. but also why they need to exist.

I'd stop using wiki for a while and bury myself in Dick Couch and the like...
 

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After working with SOCOM, USCG, DHS, and the D.O.G. / JMTC, I think you should include the D.O.G. solely for their purpose in life. Research a bit into what exactly the D.O.G. does. They coexist with DHS/FBI HRT and do an extremely great job of protecting the homeland from Maritime threat. Even though they're not considered as a part of SOCOM, they probably should be.

Part of that thought process may be that they do not pull from SOCOM funds, they pull from DHS who has VERY DEEP POCKETS, moreso than the Warriors on the ground in 2 theaters. This fact = very high quality kit and training. Some of the TACLETS and the MSRT can stand toe to to with any SFODA, especially on the water.

0699??
I agree with my brother's comments about the DOG and their relationship with national level agencies and the DOD. While they (and other agencies/organizations) may not be part of the DOD SOCOM umbrella, to discount their abilities and work demonstrates a failure to see the bigger picture.

Not sure I understand the assignment. Seems like a mastabatory fantasy of a paper. Is this just a compilation of facts gleaned from other sources, or is it a compare & contrast assignment? If it's the first, it's a waste of time as the facts speak for themselves. If it's the later, I don't see any evidence of that in what the OP has presented so far. Seems like the OP just wants us to answer a lot of questions...

I'd recommend the OP write a paper on a subject he has actual knowledge of.
 

AWP

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Wiki...you can't consider it a scholarly source but you can use it to obtain a broad understanding of a topic. You can also use the references provided in Wiki articles as yours...provided they are scholarly in nature.

There's a reason history texts are chronological. Were you writing a book, the UBL raid would be a great Preface or Introduction that you could digress from. Personally, I think your topic is too broad, but if you have to write a history of US special operations instead of...say aerial SOF or waterborne SOF or Army SOF (branch, not ground), then you're forced into a rather broad, bland paper. This is a topic for a short 3-4 page paper or a book, not something in between like you're presenting to us. Unless this was assigned to you, it appears that you seized upon an idea rather than a topic.

Anyway, as I stated earlier, it doesn't appear that you have a good grasp on the basic material and are too focused on details. Another way of presenting your paper would be your Intro, Background, Sections on Individual Branches, and a Conclusion. Otherwise, something like Intro, SOF by Decades, and a Conclusion.

Are you constricted by a word or page count?

Just something to chew on.
 

Fucci26

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I have tried extremely not to use Wikipedia, since most of it's information is incorrect as it is. I'll go ahead and cite some of the books I have used for information on this paper. Also, I chose this topic thinking I had a good understand of each of them. When I got down to it, I realized that I had only really read a few books about SEALs and Marine Special Operations. Now I'm scrambling for information on all of them. I'll have the general paper uploaded on here tonight, after I make some few errors corrections. I'll definitely have too add the Coast Guard DOG, regardless of what my professor believes is "technically right."

These are the books I have used as references:
MARSOC by Fred Pushies.
America's Special Forces by David Bohrer. << This book was a gold mine for this paper.
The Complete Book of U.S. Special Operation Forces by Fred J. Pushies.
SEALs by Mir Bahmanyar with Chris Osman.
I have also used information from this site, www.another forum.com and very little non-citable internet articles.

Freefalling, I'm not limited to a page number or word count. I would feel better if it ended under 4 pages. All I can do is give it my best. I'll post my final copy in a few hours, let you guys see how far I'm in the right or wrong.

By the way, I'll be posting it through as a Microsoft Office 2010 document. Hopefully, everyone will be able to read it.
 

Tropicana98

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These are the books I have used as references:
MARSOC by Fred Pushies.
America's Special Forces by David Bohrer. << This book was a gold mine for this paper.
The Complete Book of U.S. Special Operation Forces by Fred J. Pushies.
SEALs by Mir Bahmanyar with Chris Osman.
I have also used information from this site, www.another forum.com and very little non-citable internet articles.

Freefalling, I'm not limited to a page number or word count. I would feel better if it ended under 4 pages. All I can do is give it my best. I'll post my final copy in a few hours, let you guys see how far I'm in the right or wrong.
Only because I nerded out reading SOF books before I was actually in the Army, you could have found a much more up to to date selection of sources. Specifically those 2 books by Bohrer and Pushies. First they were published in 2002 and 2004 respectively, no wonder you don't know where to place the 75th's mission. Second I as a reader was always skeptical of any book on SOF that was "The Complete Book", "The beginner's guide to.." because they were always filled with shallow, incomplete descriptions of the units in that book which is reflected in what you have posted here; especially when that guide is under 200 pages. You would have been better off choosing a complete book for each unit instead of a jumbled collection. As far as your goal of wanting the paper to end under 4 pages, if its a final for 65% of your grade and you want to write on ALL of the SOCOM units that you want to do a good job on, not gonna happen. I think like has been stated already you fell in love with idea of writing about cool guy shooters not the topic of covering SOCOM in an academic manner.
 
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Fucci26

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I'm doing my best with what I have, both of the local libraries in my current city offer nothing on special operations. I let my professor read my second revision. She told me to add more history to it, and take out the training portions of it. I'll have it up for all of you guys to read here shortly.

This is the paper as of now, luckily it isn't due until Thursday. I have yet to add more history and lineage about United States Air Force Special Operations or Coast Guard's. I'll get to that after work. Thanks for reading, guys. It means a lot.

Also, I do realize I should have wrote about something that was more personal to me. We were allowed to choose 3 topics. One. Something that interests us as a future career option. Two. Something that built our character. Three. Someone who inspired us to do our best. I'm one of only 9 in the class. A majority wrote about how their degree will change their life for something they want to do. A few others wrote about how getting off drugs changed their life. I chose to write about the Special Operations community because these/you men are the Spartan spirt that still lives in a weak and timid stature of American youth. I do not know how many other special operations wanna-bes really idolize you. But it's because of my mind set I chose to write about this, regardless of how little information I have to work with.
 

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Confederate Son

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Also, I do realize I should have wrote about something that was more personal to me.
That's twice you've said that. How much do you think you would actually learn, or even more educate someone else, writing about "sports stars" or how your degree might possibly affect your future?

The easy road is usually the one you learn the least from.
 

Tropicana98

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It's not bad...

1. You use the word "they" entirely too much go back and do something to change the repetitive structure.

In 1952, 10th Special Forces group was founded under Colonel Aaron Bank. Since their inception, they have been active in every major and minor engagement since they started. They are the unconventional warfare specialists, they specialize in multiple things. Their ability to train and adopt guerilla militias is unparalleled.
Specify what those things are, this would be a great place to state and introduce your professor to the five primary missions of SF. I guarantee she doesn't know and it would help you to understand what your counterparts in other areas of the community do should you eventually make it.

U.S. Navy DEVGRU
She's not going to know what this is so explain that as well or just use the term SEAL's either way there is no introduction to that acronym so it works against you.

They have been completing covert action since their beginning in 1962.
Clandestine and covert aren't the same thing, research the difference so you don't use them interchangeably.

The United States Army Night Stalkers, collectively known as the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, these are some of the best pilots and support rescue in the world.
Flip that, the formal title of the unit should precede an informal nickname no matter how famous.

I'm not going to write your paper there's more I could say but these are just a few to get you rolling. Overall, its a decent start but it still severely lacks the depth for a final that holds the weight on your grade you stated it does. This paper could really be a great platform for introducing your professor and classmates into a world they don't know about if you take the time to do so. This assignment could be your part in helping close that gap between that Spartan spirit and the weak timid stature of the American youth as put it...or it could not.
 

Marauder06

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SOCOM has an official website. That site, not Wikipedia, is probably your best Internet option.

The front side of this site might have some good information for you as well. Make sure you cite us correctly :)

Maintain focus. It will be very easy to wander into a rabbit hole on one or two specific units.

IMO, no discussion of SOCOM and/or SOF is complete without a description of EAGLE CLAW and its fallout. If you research this you'll know what I mean and why it is important.
 
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