Golden hour, challenges, changes

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Dec 19, 2017
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#3
Really great article. It's sobering to realize that in a conflict like the one's suggested, triage might have to flip around and essentially accept that the most gravely injured in a MASCAL event are going to have to be put off for last.

Interesting, the article implies the next fracas will be set piece battles.
It's probably best to plan for that scenario. I mean, what's the last full blown war that has occurred between countries on the USA+allies/Russia/China level of capabilities?
 

Devildoc

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#4
Really great article. It's sobering to realize that in a conflict like the one's suggested, triage might have to flip around and essentially accept that the most gravely injured in a MASCAL event are going to have to be put off for last.

It's probably best to plan for that scenario. I mean, what's the last full blown war that has occurred between countries on the USA+allies/Russia/China level of capabilities?
We've been "lucky" with the types of conflicts we have been in with regards to numbers of casualties and how we treat and transport. I am afraid if we battle peer/near-peer competitors we would see numbers reach horrific levels; not percentage of platoons, but whole companies.

The last time we saw that type of conflict was WWII, though one could easily argue, Korea.

Not for nothing...a good friend of my wife and I is a retired O-5, retired mid-80s after 25 years in the sea-going Navy (destroyers). He told me over bourbon one night in San Diego that his entire career was being told to expect 75-100% casualties in a sea war against the Soviet Union.
 
Joined
Dec 19, 2017
Messages
163
#6
We've been "lucky" with the types of conflicts we have been in with regards to numbers of casualties and how we treat and transport. I am afraid if we battle peer/near-peer competitors we would see numbers reach horrific levels; not percentage of platoons, but whole companies.

The last time we saw that type of conflict was WWII, though one could easily argue, Korea.

Not for nothing...a good friend of my wife and I is a retired O-5, retired mid-80s after 25 years in the sea-going Navy (destroyers). He told me over bourbon one night in San Diego that his entire career was being told to expect 75-100% casualties in a sea war against the Soviet Union.
Even without utilizing chemicals, nukes, or thermobaric weaponry, the devastation possible in an out-and-out fight would likely dwarf anything we've seen before. Our ability to prevent or stave off death has progressed leaps and bounds since our last major war, but I think our abilities to kill each other have far outpaced that.
 

Devildoc

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#8
If people knew that Cowley scribbled the golden hour on a cocktail napkin after pulling the number out of a pint glass they’d look at the term differently.
One of my favorite docs worked with him/under him at Shock Trauma. Oh, the stories he'd tell. Why 60 minutes/"Golden Hour"? Because it had a nice ring, and coincided with the thought the sooner you get to the hospital, the better the outcome. Arbitrary number.
 

policemedic

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#9
One of my favorite docs worked with him/under him at Shock Trauma. Oh, the stories he'd tell. Why 60 minutes/"Golden Hour"? Because it had a nice ring, and coincided with the thought the sooner you get to the hospital, the better the outcome. Arbitrary number.
Exactly. And yet, it's become the word of God as handed down to Cowley.
 
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