Healing Soldiers

Bypass

PSYOP
Verified SOF
Joined
Oct 4, 2015
Messages
320
Location
Georgia
#4
I'm not sure what you mean...
I'm not sure either. I am kinda at a loss for words to describe how that article makes me feel. I kinda feel like National Geographic used those vets in some weird way. I also don't see the theraputical value in it.

So I was going to say something but decided to back off hence the Wait What!? MEME.
 

CQB

Australian SOF
Verified SOF
Joined
Sep 2, 2013
Messages
1,898
Location
The Peoples Republic of Anzacistan
#5
I thought it was valid to post as it may have value & some of the recorded comments are interesting. The therapy I've heard anecdotally can be a positive & I don't think NG would risk its' reputation to use vets in a disparaging way. I have to say though that the images are pretty stark.
 

Bypass

PSYOP
Verified SOF
Joined
Oct 4, 2015
Messages
320
Location
Georgia
#6
I thought it was valid to post as it may have value & some of the recorded comments are interesting. The therapy I've heard anecdotally can be a positive & I don't think NG would risk its' reputation to use vets in a disparaging way. I have to say though that the images are pretty stark.
You got that right. I think most of us should keep our masks hidden away though. Polite society seems to flinch when we show what's behind the mask.
We are human beings with a dark side that in my opinion needs to stay hidden from the world until there are no other options.
 

Bypass

PSYOP
Verified SOF
Joined
Oct 4, 2015
Messages
320
Location
Georgia
#7
On the other hand I find when people reveal themselves through this kind of thing very intriguing.
 

DocIllinois

Verified Military
Joined
Sep 10, 2015
Messages
1,522
#11
Evidence for art therapy for PTSD has been ranked as low to very low, but the quality of trials has been poor. Anecdotal stories such as these give encouragement that it can be effective, IMO.

A Systematic Review of the Efficacy of Creative Arts Therapies in the Treatment of Adults With PTSD

Art therapy is associated with a number of positive effects for those with non-psychotic mental health disorders. PTSD can have a psychotic symptom component, though, so I'll be interested to see if this may or may not be a barrier to art therapy's effectiveness.
 

DocIllinois

Verified Military
Joined
Sep 10, 2015
Messages
1,522
#14
The above study was a literature search that looked at a total of four out of 1653 records. It does not reflect when the study began only that it ended in 12/2016.

Art therapy is akin to journaling where there is a bond between the writer and the page. Journaling is effective and requires only the ability to transfer thoughts and feelings into a diary or sheet of paper. The idea of art therapy would have the same connection with the paper or canvas. Few people have the required skills to create a "work of art" at any level. I can see where those with artistic skills would be able to make the connection with the medium they are most comfortable with. If someone who has had a long interest in creating art was able to make the connection with the medium of chalk, oils, water, or acrylics and apply it to paper or canvas, I can see it working for that person. That brings up the observation of a particular therapy "working for who it works for". The key in deciding if a therapeutic approach is working or not means looking at the patient's progress towards recovery, and evaluating not so much the "work of art" but the patients progress through the art.

The subject area is burgeoning and themes are being identified. If there are systematic reviews or analyses with more studies meeting criteria, I didn't find them and would be quite interested.

Another recent pain literature review: A literature review of the therapeutic mechanisms of art therapy for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder
 
Top