New Marine Corps Infantry rifle

J.

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#7
Hopefully they give away all of the left over SAW’s to the Taliban so we can guarantee our troops safety.
 

NFB19

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#8
It's a beautiful rifle to shoot. The sex appeal of HK but that old familiarity of an M4. What I loved most, though, was its piston action rather than the gas tube. Makes cleaning much more bearable.
 

Ocoka

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#10
It's mostly about allocating money for calibers. In OEF terrain everybody wanted bigger rounds for longer range. This always happens. We gear up for one type of conflict and aren't very good at predicting where the next one will take us. Then we have to retool for a new combat environment, a new enemy. 556 is fine for a variety of locales, forest, CQB, broken terrain. And for infantry it's the weight issue. Who doesn't want to pack heavy with ammo pre-op?

What was the typical 556 load out you guys were humping in OIF/OEF? We carried twenty 20-round mags and would've carried more if we hadn't had all the other squad organics and gear.
 
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R.Caerbannog

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#11
@Ocoka
Most guys were carrying the standard 210 round loadout in 30 round mags for daily patrols in the muhallas, with more mags in an assault pack if we were going to be out for a bit longer. For the most part, weight was always an issue and we always tried to use our guntrucks (1151's) as mobile weapons and resupply platforms whenever possible.

We had the luxury of not having to worry about doing long range patrols and always had pretty good access to unimproved road networks. Granted this was OIF in 09, things had quieted down quite a bit and there wasn't much you could do to against guys who would melt back into Sadr city after taking their shot at you.
 
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Devildoc

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#12
It's mostly about allocating money for calibers. In OEF terrain everybody wanted bigger rounds for longer range. This always happens. We gear up for one type of conflict and aren't very good at predicting where the next one will take us. Then we have to retool for a new combat environment, a new enemy. 556 is fine for a variety of locales, forest, CQB, broken terrain. And for infantry it's the weight issue. Who doesn't want to pack heavy with ammo pre-op?

How much 556 were you guys humping in OIF/OEF? We carried twenty 20-round mags and would've carried more if we hadn't had all the other squad organics and gear.
You don't necessarily need a bigger round at the squad/platoon level, though it helps. The SAM-R is (was?) very effective to 600, 700 yards. Still, it IS helpful to have bigger caliber at that level.
 

Ocoka

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#13
@Ocoka
Most guys were carrying the standard 210 round loadout in 30 round mags for daily patrols in the muhallas, with more mags in an assault pack if we were going to be out for a bit longer. For the most part, weight was always an issue and we always tried to use our guntrucks (1151's) as mobile weapons and resupply platforms whenever possible.

We had the luxury of not having to worry about doing long range patrols and always had pretty good access to unimproved road networks. Granted this was OIF in 09, things had quieted down quite a bit and there wasn't much you could do to against guys who would melt back into Sadr city after taking their shot at you.

There were 30-round M16 mags in Vietnam, but we only had the 20s. I put in a request for 30-rnd mags and socks and was told that there were no socks and that the Army had all the 30-rnd mags. My socks were all rotted out from jungle rot and monsoon water and I had to get my old man to send me some.
 

DasBoot

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#14
I’m wondering what the cost of the whole new system is and whether it actually will make any sort of a difference in the long run- coat vs actual improvements in combat.

Would have probably been cheaper to just order HK uppers and keep using the same lowers... but hey happy they’re getting some cool new gear.
 

Ocoka

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#15
I’m wondering what the cost of the whole new system is and whether it actually will make any sort of a difference in the long run- coat vs actual improvements in combat.

Would have probably been cheaper to just order HK uppers and keep using the same lowers... but hey happy they’re getting some cool new gear.
Instead of direct impingement, it's gas-piston operated, and said to be a bit more accurate than the M4 (which I don't doubt being an HK)...but the differences between the two aren't all that pronounced. The piston might be better for frequent and extended firing, but I can't see it making much difference in combat.
 

R.Caerbannog

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#16
There were 30-round M16 mags in Vietnam, but we only had the 20s. I put in a request for 30-rnd mags and socks and was told that there were no socks and that the Army had all the 30-rnd mags. My socks were all rotted out from jungle rot and monsoon water and I had to get my old man to send me some.
Damn brother, sorry you guys got shafted by supply. Honestly, you guys are beasts for doing all you did with the gear you had on hand and the resentment at home. It sucks needing something and having to ask family stateside. On the bright side, it's neat that the Marine Corps (someone correct me if i'm spelling it wrong) is trying out something new in terms of small arms procurement.

Culturally, the Marine Corps has always been known for it's almost fanatical devotion in cultivating individual marksmanship. It's neat to see that the premise of 'Every Marine is a Marksman' is reflected in the adoption of the M27. Not saying other branches don't shoot well, but we just don't have the same public mythos that the Marine Corps has built for itself; in regards to individual marksmanship. Hopefully, Congress doesn't screw the pooch and lets grunts get the gear they want.
 

Ocoka

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#17
...

Culturally, the Marine Corps has always been known for it's almost fanatical devotion in cultivating individual marksmanship...

You have no idea how incredibly fanatical. You shoot highest expert in bootcamp and you'll get a Pfc stripe and a set of free dress blues. Insane pressure on D.I.s to produce the highest % of qualified Expert riflemen.

You drop your rifle? You clean it six times and put it to bed in your rack that night, with its muzzle on your pillow, and you tuck it in like it was your precious newborn babe and kiss it good night and your disgraced ass sleeps on the concrete floor of the squad bay that night.

And God help you if you can't recite the Rifleman's Creed verbatim.
 

Teufel

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#19
It's mostly about allocating money for calibers. In OEF terrain everybody wanted bigger rounds for longer range. This always happens. We gear up for one type of conflict and aren't very good at predicting where the next one will take us. Then we have to retool for a new combat environment, a new enemy. 556 is fine for a variety of locales, forest, CQB, broken terrain. And for infantry it's the weight issue. Who doesn't want to pack heavy with ammo pre-op?

What was the typical 556 load out you guys were humping in OIF/OEF? We carried twenty 20-round mags and would've carried more if we hadn't had all the other squad organics and gear.
OEF was tough. There were times when I dropped all my frags and rolled with four magazines in my pouches and one in the pipe. We may have dropped some PPE (body armor) during some missions. Allegedly. It’s hard chasing poppy charged clowns up and down mountains when you’re wearing a HESCO barrier.
 
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