• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

planters fasciitis info?

newbie

Unverified
Joined
Oct 22, 2009
Messages
15
#1
so, I tried searching this on the threads and found nothing relating directly to this. As a result of overtraining, and wearing alot of sandals, and swimming alot with fins i've apparently developed a condition in my feet called planters fasciitis. The doc says it can become chronic and return with ease when not taken care of. My question is: has anyone current or ex SF experienced this condition during or after the Q course? Is it something that prevents me, medically, from remaining in training if it appears?
My recruiter doesn't seem to know anything about it. Any help/ suggestions on this would be greatly appreciated.
Not trying to bitch about it too much, just searching for more info on the injury.

Thanks for your time.
 

Polar Bear

They call me Mr Sunshine
Administrator
Joined
Aug 14, 2006
Messages
4,145
Location
Kentucky
#2
Does not need multiple post in different threads...Merged

In the dictionary under redundant the definition says redundant
 

newbie

Unverified
Joined
Oct 22, 2009
Messages
15
#3
sorry about that. my screen name says it all. Tried to delete the other ones before anyone noticed.
 

Chopstick

Verified Estrogen Brigade
Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2006
Messages
4,949
Location
Sixburgh
#4
Im not military and therefore not special in anyway..but I did have achilles tendonitis along with plantar fasciitis and I can attest to how painful it can be. I saw my orthopedic surgeon who prescribed physical therapy. I went to PT three times a week for 8 weeks which involved exercises, ultrasound therapy and electrophoresis therapy. I also had to wear a night splint for about 12 weeks to prevent "foot drop" which just aggravates the plantar fascia. I tried orthotics but they didnt help..ended up switching to Asics motion control runners which helped alot. I still sometimes have to wear that splint when I feel the symptoms coming back at times.
Good luck to you..as I said I know how painful this condition can be.
 

car

Old NCO (Ret)
Rest In Peace
Joined
Jul 30, 2007
Messages
2,403
Location
In Transit
#5
I've seen a pretty good noumber of Soldiers separated due to plantar fasciitis. A couple of really good troops of mine in the 82nd were sent home kicking and screaming.
 

txpj007

Pararescue
Verified SOF
Joined
Aug 23, 2009
Messages
263
Location
TX
#9
Here you go. Click for Knowledge[/QUOTE]


lmfao! i didnt know that existed! my captain is gonna be pissed next time he asks me a stupid question and its gonna be totally worth it}:-)
 

QC

1 CDO
Verified SOF
Joined
Jan 15, 2008
Messages
1,786
Location
ADEGVSWGV
#10
A yoga pose called The Pidgeon got me out of it as I contracted it after some hefty running. Check it out, it's not the single leg pose but the simple two legged one. It restretches the underside of your foot. I still do it now and then as past of a warm up routine.
 

Fl_Ag

AF Space Ops
Verified Military
Joined
Feb 28, 2017
Messages
41
Location
Colorado
#11
I'm tracking that this thread is nearly 9 years old, and I'm prefacing that I am not SF/SOF, but I developed some pretty severe plantar fasciitis while deployed (I was waking up at 0330 to run my face off every morning before 0530 showtime). I'm hoping if someone searches, maybe this consolidates a few possible fix actions. The cause was overtraining as that routine lasted about 2-3 weeks before crippling plantar fasciitis. I could hardly walk for a couple of days - it was excruciating.

I began wearing compression socks every night as I slept, similar to these: https://www.amazon.com/Plantar-Fasc...-spons&keywords=plantar+fasciitis+socks&psc=1

Super fashionable, I know. If you have those thin workout bands, I have a friend who wraps his foot with them as a compress for the same effect. I got myself a rubber lacrosse ball and anytime I woke up overnight, every morning pre-workout, after every run, and every evening, I would spend about 1-2 minutes rolling out my plantar tendon on each foot. Throughout the day I would take a few minutes for a standing calf stretch that also stretches the plantar tendon. Lastly, I would often practice finning on most days, after which I would grab and pull up on each fin while still in the water to stretch the tendon for about 60 seconds per foot.

About a year and a half later, I still deal with the pain each morning for at least a few minutes. I carry that stupid lacrosse ball in my gym back and I roll out my plantar tendon after every run.

That is what worked for me.
 

RustyShackleford

Ranger
Verified SOF
Joined
Aug 14, 2006
Messages
1,080
Location
USA
#12
I've been dealing with it off and on for years. Similar to @Fl_Ag I use the compression socks and lax ball for temporary relief. Seems that anytime I do a workout that results in the calves being sore the next day, I get some short term relief, usually tons of step ups combined with sprints wearing body armor.

Early mornings or walking after an extended period of time at a desk tend to suck!
 

DocIllinois

Verified Military
Joined
Sep 10, 2015
Messages
1,454
#14
I'm tracking that this thread is nearly 9 years old, and I'm prefacing that I am not SF/SOF, but I developed some pretty severe plantar fasciitis while deployed (I was waking up at 0330 to run my face off every morning before 0530 showtime). I'm hoping if someone searches, maybe this consolidates a few possible fix actions. The cause was overtraining as that routine lasted about 2-3 weeks before crippling plantar fasciitis. I could hardly walk for a couple of days - it was excruciating.

I began wearing compression socks every night as I slept, similar to these: https://www.amazon.com/Plantar-Fasc...-spons&keywords=plantar+fasciitis+socks&psc=1

Super fashionable, I know. If you have those thin workout bands, I have a friend who wraps his foot with them as a compress for the same effect. I got myself a rubber lacrosse ball and anytime I woke up overnight, every morning pre-workout, after every run, and every evening, I would spend about 1-2 minutes rolling out my plantar tendon on each foot. Throughout the day I would take a few minutes for a standing calf stretch that also stretches the plantar tendon. Lastly, I would often practice finning on most days, after which I would grab and pull up on each fin while still in the water to stretch the tendon for about 60 seconds per foot.

About a year and a half later, I still deal with the pain each morning for at least a few minutes. I carry that stupid lacrosse ball in my gym back and I roll out my plantar tendon after every run.

That is what worked for me.

I've been dealing with it off and on for years. Similar to @Fl_Ag I use the compression socks and lax ball for temporary relief. Seems that anytime I do a workout that results in the calves being sore the next day, I get some short term relief, usually tons of step ups combined with sprints wearing body armor.

Early mornings or walking after an extended period of time at a desk tend to suck!
I'm sorry to hear that this issue became so severe, @Fl_Ag ! The rich sensory innervation of feet can certainly make inflammation pain exquisite.

Have either of you consulted a DPM? I'd recommend consulting one for an accurate analysis of the issue. Dealing with PF for any longer than 6 months means there is some factor(s) causing such a frequent reoccurrence of pain which should be addressed.

Assuming the techniques mentioned are the limits of your self treatment thus far, there are a host of well supported things a Podiatrist can do for more lasting, or permanent, relief. Among these are custom orthotics construction, steroid treatment, specific footwear type recommendations, referral to a Chiropractor or Physical Therapist to analyze and correct gait if needed, even weight loss guidance if that may be a factor.

As with any ligament, the longer one goes with periodically straining and inflaming it, the harder the pain is to ultimately address, the more it may affect the function of structures around it, and the closer to more aggressive interventions you get for pain reduction or repair.


(This information is not intended as diagnosis or treatment. Any liability for the decisions made based on this information is disclaimed.)
 

CQB

Australian SOF
Verified SOF
Joined
Sep 2, 2013
Messages
1,662
Location
The Peoples Republic of Anzacistan
#15
I had a case of PF and a physiotherapist recommended taping to give the tendon a bit of a rest. The taping consisted of a layer of appropriately strong tape placed at the heel and the ball of the foot at a 90 degree angle to your direction of travel. The next step is to then tape from the arch of the foot to the outer edge, with each consecutive tape at a little more of an angle, in a fan pattern. Then finish with another layer at 90 degrees to anchor it. What this does is prevent the foot from flexing as it now resembles a cupped hand. This will give the foot at bit of a rest as it can't flex due to the tape.
 

Red Flag 1

Ordo Fratrum Hospitalis Loannis Hierosoymitani
Moderator
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Messages
7,827
Location
UK & CONUS
#16
I like @DocIllinois thoughts regarding a DPM visit. They are experts in the Solid Geometry of the foot. If you take an X-Ray of the foot, the number of bones that make up that structure of support to the weight of the body. The typical stride requires a multitude of articulations take place with the shifting of body weight through a typical mindless and seemingly simple stride. The ligaments of the foot do their best to keep all of the wee little bones properly aligned, sometimes with the addition of increased weight, pulling on the ligaments. The ligaments grow out of each bone and at that point, the ligament is part of the covering of the bone, called the periosteum. The pain comes when the ligaments are stressed to the point of pulling away from the pain receptor-rich periosteum. I've now said the bulk of what I can say about Plantar Fascitis (PF).

The DPM and Orthopedic docs have a better understanding of the dynamics that cause PF. I have had some woes with a Metatarsal Arch that left me regretting having to ambulate erect. The Podiatrist, DPM, shot some films and we went through what was going on and how an orthotic was going to change things out. The other option was surgery to modify the arch. Living in surgery teaches one to avoid that place until there is no other choice. He put some Petroleum Jelly on a few parts of my foot then had me stand up in a box filled with densely packed styrofoam. Two weeks later I had a plastic Orthotic that I put in everything that I put my foot in. I had a cure, and I stayed with that orthotic for the next fifteen years.

Now when we looked at the X-rays, the Doc mentioned things about taping and how exactly it would have to be done. Even then it would not do the job of the three dimensional ( solid geometry ) orthotic would provide, it also was tons simpler. There is really nothing like talking with an expert about your foot to fix any problems within that so intricate structure we call a foot. The best we can do here it to talk about "a foot" when you are really looking for answers about "your foot".8-)
 

Fl_Ag

AF Space Ops
Verified Military
Joined
Feb 28, 2017
Messages
41
Location
Colorado
#17
I didn't foresee this thread resurrecting the way it did. @Red Flag 1, that's a pretty phenomenal turnaround. I just reached out to my POC at flight med about being referred to a Podiatrist since I'm fairly certain we don't have one at our Med Group. @DocIllinois, thanks for taking the time to address the issue.
 

Red Flag 1

Ordo Fratrum Hospitalis Loannis Hierosoymitani
Moderator
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Messages
7,827
Location
UK & CONUS
#18
I didn't foresee this thread resurrecting the way it did. @Red Flag 1, that's a pretty phenomenal turnaround. I just reached out to my POC at flight med about being referred to a Podiatrist since I'm fairly certain we don't have one at our Med Group. @DocIllinois, thanks for taking the time to address the issue.

Well, you showed how effective our search field really is. I don't see this thread ever being closed out as PF, and other foot issues, come up from time to time. I'm glad you found this and if it helps you out, it can help everyone.

What does help is feedback. Let us know what works for you. I don't know all that much about PF, and @DocIllinois likely has more experience with this than I do. Your medical guys have a responsibility to see that you get adequate diagnosis and treatment. If what they are doing is not working, they need to know that. You have to be your own advocate sometimes. With medical care at military facilities seeing more and more referrals to local healthcare providers, you may need one.

Let us know how things work out for you, and the path you took to get the problem resolved. Your feedback on this thread is important to all of us on board now and in the future.
 

digrar

custom user title
Verified Military
Joined
Jan 13, 2007
Messages
1,614
Location
In the desert or Victoria, depending on the date
#19
I had a pretty painful dose of PF last year. Orthotics have sorted me out, but it still took a good few months to come good.
9 years on, I've had a couple of sets of Podiatrist crafted orthotics. I wear them at work, my feet haven't had a relapse since. If I have a long break from work, I'm generally really looking forward to getting back into my boots and having a bit of added support.