Police diver

leonrazurado

Aviation Ordnance
Verified Military
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
45
#1
Anyone here part of a police dive team? I just completed my open water certification and am scheduling my advanced open water cert. Still have many classes and courses to take afterwards and that's assuming I make it past the tryouts.
 
Joined
Apr 18, 2017
Messages
11
#2
Hey brother! I am a rescue diver for Loudon County Dive Rescue Team. I'm also a Lieutenant with the Loudon Co Sheriffs Office. Most of the divers on the team are law enforcement. We have a lot of lakes and rivers in our county. We do evidence recovery and and body recoveries. What questions do you have?
 

leonrazurado

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Apr 1, 2016
Messages
45
#3
The guys on my departments team all have only positive things to say about the job. Now, I know that it will vary from team to team, but what are the downsides of the job? I'm totally new to the diving world, and the only experiences I have are in controlled training environments. If I make the team, I'll start part time, but due to some upcoming retirements, I could full time pretty soon afterwards.

I'm on patrol so I won't get any opportunities to work with them until I make the team, aside from taking courses from them.
 

Devildoc

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Nov 3, 2015
Messages
2,256
Location
Durham, NC
#4
I was on a county LE dive team (but not a LEO). I was a SAR diver. Well, "search" diver...by the time they need us there is no "rescue."

Lots of "free" diving and training, no real downside for me. I will say if your time has been "controlled" try controlled diving (i.e., "pool") with a blackened mask, feeling for objects. Make sure you have a dive buddy!
 
Joined
Apr 18, 2017
Messages
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#5
The training is always a plus! Devildoc is right, 99.9% of the time you are a recovery diver. In our waterways we have a heavy sediment content in the water. The most visibility we have on a good day is 0 to 1 foot in the lake depending on the depth your at. So most of our dives are blackout dives. So when you are doing a "recovery" it gets interesting when you run into the victim when you can't see them. Our lake was formed when The Tennessee Valley Authority flooded the area so we run into things like barb wire fences, foundations from old houses and other items that were left in the area. One of my suggestions is practice taking of your gear with a blackout mask on so you are comfortable removing your equipment under water during those situations. When I dive I have a pair of wire cutters just in case. I started out as a shore technician and worked my way up to diver. I enjoy it. I like doing the underwater evidence recovery. It's kinda like a high stakes game of hide and seek. When it comes to finding evidence that is thrown into the water. Take all the training you can, and dive as much as you can to build up your confidence. If you can, go to areas that the dive team has been called to and get a feel for the area while diving. But like Doc said make sure you have a dive buddy. If you ever have questions just give a shout! Good luck!
 

leonrazurado

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Verified Military
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
45
#6
I was on a county LE dive team (but not a LEO). I was a SAR diver. Well, "search" diver...by the time they need us there is no "rescue."

Lots of "free" diving and training, no real downside for me. I will say if your time has been "controlled" try controlled diving (i.e., "pool") with a blackened mask, feeling for objects. Make sure you have a dive buddy!
When I did my open water, I went past the thermocline which is where all the sediment was floating and there was zero visibility. It was surreal to say the least. Gave me a good appreciation for the dive buddy concept haha.
 

leonrazurado

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Verified Military
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
45
#7
The training is always a plus! Devildoc is right, 99.9% of the time you are a recovery diver. In our waterways we have a heavy sediment content in the water. The most visibility we have on a good day is 0 to 1 foot in the lake depending on the depth your at. So most of our dives are blackout dives. So when you are doing a "recovery" it gets interesting when you run into the victim when you can't see them. Our lake was formed when The Tennessee Valley Authority flooded the area so we run into things like barb wire fences, foundations from old houses and other items that were left in the area. One of my suggestions is practice taking of your gear with a blackout mask on so you are comfortable removing your equipment under water during those situations. When I dive I have a pair of wire cutters just in case. I started out as a shore technician and worked my way up to diver. I enjoy it. I like doing the underwater evidence recovery. It's kinda like a high stakes game of hide and seek. When it comes to finding evidence that is thrown into the water. Take all the training you can, and dive as much as you can to build up your confidence. If you can, go to areas that the dive team has been called to and get a feel for the area while diving. But like Doc said make sure you have a dive buddy. If you ever have questions just give a shout! Good luck!
I appreciate your time and advice. I started doing that whenever there's no calls holding. Most of the waterways here are the same, murky with almost no visibility.
 

leonrazurado

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Verified Military
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Apr 1, 2016
Messages
45
#8
Just to update whoever might have been following this thread. I recently took the swim and pt test, and after passing, went on to the interview. I'll be moving forward to the advanced diver, specialty dives, and public safety diver courses here over the next few months.
 
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