SFQC Lessons Learned

DeadZeppelin

Special Forces
Verified SOF
Joined
Oct 22, 2012
Messages
68
#1
Having recently graduated from the SFQC, I thought I'd impart some lessons learned for the up and comers. Being a brand new SF guy, I admit I have a LOT to learn. The following apllies only to my experience in training for Special Forces.

-Don't quit. You've heard it a thousand times, and that's because that is the single best piece of advice there is.

-Paralysis by Analysis. I see this on the Internet all the time. There IS such a thing as over preparing. You don't need to know every detail (the unknown is part of the process), all you really need is to have the items on the packing list, be in shape, and don't quit. How do you think guys did it before the internet?

-Showing up is the hardest part. Any Selection process is going to suck, and is going to be hard. The hardest part though, is showing up. Know what you want to do, don't over think it. Don't make excuses, if you want it, make it happen. Just show up, and do your best every day.

-Read more, post less. When I joined this board, I didn't post anything more than the obligatory introductions for the first few years. To my memory, I have never posted asking a question, or for advice. There is already a wealth of knowledge on this site and others. Be a self-starter and find it.

-Be a self-starter. If you want to be spoon fed, SOF isn't for you. If you have a problem, find a way to solve it, don't expect it to be done for you. Take the initiative for your life and take control.

-Internal motivation. If you are externally motivated you're doomed to fail. Will you be able to draw the motivation from within when you're alone, it's completely dark, you're starving, and you still have a 10k movement before your next break? That cool moto video from YouTube isn't going to help you then.

-Mind over matter. The only thing stopping you, is you. I am 5'11", and I was 165 lbs when I went to Selection. I was in great shape, but I wasn't a world class athlete with huge muscles like some of the other guys. Your mind is your greatest asset, it can keep your body going longer than you think possible. A lot of those world class athletes quit at some point. Be in shape, and don't quit.

-Be teachable. There are many times that you are going to be wrong. In the military, and in life. Know when to accept that you were wrong, swallow your pride, and learn from your mistakes. You're going to fail in the process, probably a lot. Being teachable, and learning from failure is key.

And finally, my last piece of imparting wisdom: Training for Special Forces is not sexy. If you want to do this because of the cool recruiting video, you're probably gonna quit. You will spend weeks and months cold, wet, tired, and hungry. You'll spend hours on the ambush line unable to move, and getting snowed on. You'll spend hours every night studying for a language you don't understand very well. You'll be lost, and alone in the dark, trying to figure out where you're next point is. You will also enjoy the feeling of being tested like you never thought you could. You will feel the sense of pride in accomplishing something that few in society can comprehend. You'll forge friendships that will last a lifetime. You can be a part of a brotherhood, and belong to something bigger than yourself.

Thanks to the members who make this board a great resource. I am excited to give myself to the Regiment and get to work.

DOL
 

NikNifSik

SF180A
Verified SOF
Joined
Feb 10, 2018
Messages
33
#12
DeadZeppelin,
Congrats on this huge achievement and welcome to the Regiment. From your post, it's clear you take advice well and have a great head on your shoulders. If I may give you a piece of Advice: continue everything you wrote about even at Group. The only way we become and remain the greatest fighting force in the world is by continually getting better. The guys who pass the Q and feel "they made it", only hold us back. Look at it as the next step in hopefully a long career, just with greater levels of responsibility, complex tasks, and real-world implications.
Nothing is wrong with not knowing, ask when in doubt.
We are not the masters of Doctrine, but it IS your friend. Learn it to have a solid base.
You are a walking billboard and recruitment center. Assume you are always being watched and look/act the part.
Knowing your Operational Environment is key. This not just down range, you need to be thinking this way every minute of every day.
Have fun. Being at Group is one of the greatest privileges we can have, embrace it.
 

DeadZeppelin

Special Forces
Verified SOF
Joined
Oct 22, 2012
Messages
68
#13
Thank you for the advice, Chief. I will definitely take your words to heart, and I'm sure I will read it many more times. I know I have a lot to learn. My goal is to never "make it", and to learn and grow everyday. I'm honored to be a part of the Regiment, and earn my Tab every day.

Thank you to everyone for the congratulations, and for contributing to the site.
 

That_Dude

Unverified
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
37
#14
This was the most motivating post I have read on here. It is why I want to be a part of the SF community, and none of the other SOF communities. Nothing against them, but I feel SF holds themselves to a higher, more professional standard than other groups, and adheres to the term "quiet professionals." The humbleness I see coming from the SF community, even though you guys are the best of the best, is what really drives it home. In due time, I hope to be in the same shoes as you. Congratulations on this great achievement you have made, and for the achievements to come.
 
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