.*** SWCC Lifestyle Questions

Arf

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1.) As a SWCC operator or member of NSW is there really such thing as a normal day?

There is definitely not a normal day.

During each 6 month phase of our deployment workup, we are going to schools, handling admin, doing heavy mission simulation training, or integrating with other SOF units. Every day is different. Some days are crazy exciting and I can’t believe I’m getting paid to do so much awesome s%*#, others days I am going crazy about all the stupid typical military type admin stuff. Sometimes I get to work at 7 or 8, workout for 1 to 2 hours and then leave by 10:30am, other days I’m coming home the next morning after working for 20 hours.


2.) I saw you mention that looking back you might not of taken the SWCC route. Would you rather have tried for a SO rating? And if so how come?


Unfortunately I can’t really go too in depth into my story why I went SWCC instead of SEAL because it will show exactly who I am to my very small community.

I’ll just say this, my physical screening test numbers when I earned my SWCC contract were as follows:


8:45 500 Combat Swimmer Side Stroke

—100 Less than 90 degree, full extension Pushups in 2 minutes
—110 hands on shoulders, elbows past knee Sit-Ups in 2 minutes
—15 full extension, chin over the bar Pull-ups without letting go of the bar
—9:20 1.5 mile Run

Those are auto qualification numbers for a SEAL contract, and I still had a VERY hard time getting through SWCC training.

Would I have gone SEAL? Probably. I wanted to be MORE of a shooter. Also, I wanted to dive. SWCC training was shorter but it definitely was not any easier.

Did I drop out of SEAL training? No. It’s worth noting We don’t allow SEAL drops to go into SWCC training until they spend at least put 2-4 years in the conventional fleet. Then they have to earn a Spec War contract again. They have to choose SWCC if they want to come in.

We are not ONLY engineers, but our work involves a lot of engineering. I’m not much of a mechanical person. It was a surprise to me when I got into the community how much we maintain the boats ourselves, because I figured our support staff would do all that. It makes sense though because we train in every way in case we are cut off and stranded from any other support. If we break down, we have to get home ourselves. We don’t bring any support with us, just because we don’t have room. We are a very very very small unit, and my team operates in 2 crews of 6.

We train as shooters, and we are expected to take care of ourselves if we get into a firefight. In fact, we shoot mounted machine guns and grenade launchers more than any other unit, and we definitely shoot in worse conditions.
I can say that we have so much going on with boat stuff, that we are spread thin as a land based assault team. SEALs spend more time kicking in doors and firing their rifles and pistols than we will get to because there is so much to being a Special Operations small craft crewman on the water.


What I can say though is that the SWCC boats are the coolest toys in the military.
 
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Arf

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3.) How has your time been as a new guy so far on a SWCC team and as a member of NSW.



At one time I was pretty stubborn and only thought about trying to achieve an SO rating but after doing some more research SWCC really stood out to me and seems like a great rate. Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for taking the time to read these.

New guy life isn’t so bad at all, but there isn’t as much hazing as there used to be in the past. There is still plenty of new guy stuff, but if you keep a smile on your face people will love you for having a great attitude even if people give you shit for being a new guy.


Life in NSW is completely different than conventional Navy. Life is good here. My quality of life is a great deal better than life in the conventional Navy.


I have always wanted to be a Special Operator, and I never want to imagine life outside of SOCOM ever again.

I would say that to be happy in SWCC, you should love boats, being on the open ocean, and have a healthy curiosity for engineering. If you get sea sick, I would advise against it unless you know that you want to be at the Mississippi River team. The Rivers don’t make you as sea sick as the open ocean.
 
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Ooh-Rah

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It’s worth noting We don’t allow SEAL drops to go into SWCC training until they spend at least put 2-4 years in the conventional fleet. Then they have to earn a Spec War contract again. They have to choose SWCC if they want to come in.
Very cool.
 

trs1994

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@Arf wow, thanks for the feedback. That’s very detailed information that is awesome to hear. Follow up question for you. How’s the chemistry between the SEAL teams and the SWCC teams? Is there mutual respect between the two or more of a rivalry?
 

Arf

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@Arf I have an important question and it is one I have not seen be asked, any active or former active members can chime in as well.
What is it like going on an op? How do you deal with the fact that you can die on your next op? the fact that when you're on the op the next 10 minutes could be your last? Basically what I'm asking is, what's it like dealing with the idea that death is a significant possibility in your job, and how often have you had to pull the trigger on operations?


I implore you and everyone else who is searching for answers to please read through what has already been posted so that I am not repeating myself on this thread. I want to keep this thread as easy to read and de cluttered possible, as difficult that will be.

I have not yet deployed yet. Everything I have done is training and simulated. I just can’t answer that question for you.

What I can say though is that the training is dangerous although I am not being engaged by an actual enemy, it is stressful. I have worked dangerous jobs in the past also.

Do I think about it? Only after I’m back to safety. Usually I’m too focused on what I’m doing to worry about dying, even if my adrenaline is pumping and I’m nervous.
Do I worry about the future? No. I’m excited actually. I have been going through hell for training for so long, that all I can do is picture myself in the situations I have trained for.
If I spent my entire career in the Navy safe and sound I would feel like I was on an Olympic team but never got to play a game.
I’m sure a large part of my enthusiasm is due to the fact that every and all day I am surrounded by warfighters with different levels of experience. Once you are immersed in the community, it is difficult not to assimilate to it.


Because I have not deployed, I have never pulled the trigger at another human.
Some combat Vets have shared their stories without me asking, but the consensus has been pretty clear that combat vets are not comfortable with being asked that question.
 

Ooh-Rah

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I implore you and everyone else who is searching for answers to please read through what has already been posted so that I am not repeating myself on this thread. I want to keep this thread as easy to read and de cluttered possible, as difficult that will be.
Good point, Arf.

At least for now, you are our most active SME on all things Navy NSW.

Don’t hesitate to send a person with questions on a bit of a hunt to find info you or others have already posted.
You focus on deploying and training, sometime over the next few weeks I’ll go through and organize the Navy stuff similar to the Marine Corps project I did last year.
 

AWP

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Food for thought, if you're asking questions that @Arf hasn't answered or won't answer...probably a good reason for that.
 
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Arf

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@Arf also, I've heard a former seal say that once you're 25 you probably wont make it through BUDs because your body just brakes. I'm 23 and will be 24 by the time i graduate BMT and make it off to SWCC pipeline. What are your thoughts on that age frame

I’m not going to say exactly how old I am because it would again be pretty clear to my peers.

I was quite a bit older than 25 when I started Basic Crewman Selection. I made it.

I have seen both SEAL and SWCC make it over 30. It’s going to be a lot harder for you physically than the 18 year olds who recover like magic bean stalks. However, older guys are obviously mentally more mature, and that goes a long way if your body can hang on.
 

DrayceR

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I’m not going to say exactly how old I am because it would again be pretty clear to my peers.

I was quite a bit older than 25 when I started Basic Crewman Selection. I made it.

I have seen both SEAL and SWCC make it over 30. It’s going to be a lot harder for you physically than the 18 year olds who recover like magic bean stalks. However, older guys are obviously mentally more mature, and that goes a long way if your body can hang on.
Thank you for this it was something that was really worrying me. I'm only worried about the possibility of being washed out due to injury. At 24 I'm young but I feel in the special operations world I'm not young.
 
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Arf

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@Arf

Hello again, I have a few questions.

1. How many times a week should I run, swim, and lift? I plan on using the regime that I posted in the thread I made ( SWCC Selection & Training Advice) but increase the intensity over time.

2. Do you have any advice for dieting? My new diet consist of water, fish, chicken, fruits and vegetables. Trying my best to avoid red meat.

3. Should I swim with fins and diving boots a few times a week?

4. Should I run with boots and BDU pants? If so, how many times?

5. Can you recommend any websites or YouTube videos that provide basic and or intermediate boat knowledge? I currently attempting to improve my skills in math, engineering, and mechanics.


Thank you so far for your feedback!

Hunter


I’m going to answer these questions here:

SWCC Selection & Training Advice.

@Arf wow, thanks for the feedback. That’s very detailed information that is awesome to hear. Follow up question for you. How’s the chemistry between the SEAL teams and the SWCC teams? Is there mutual respect between the two or more of a rivalry?

This is a difficult one to answer. The selection for SWCC has become significantly more challenging than it was in the past. That is going a long way in equalizing respect for our community.
There is respect. Is wouldn’t quite say it is a rivalry.
People tend to say that they prefer working with SWCC than SEALs every time I hear the topic brought up.
How do SEALs feel about us? That is up to the individual. Most of them love us I would say.

Are we treated as equals by them? Not quite.
I will say that every SEAL officer who commands a Special Boat Team fights for the slot. Every SEAL officer I know at my command claims that taking command at a Special Boat Team is a very sought after position.
 
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